Thuja, Sabina & Cedarwood

Remedies from the Cupressaceae family

I now also wish to look at Thuja and Sabina.  As these two remedies are also from the Cupressaceae family, I believe we will find more similarities than differences.

Thuja occidentalis

Also known as American Arbor-Vitae (tree of life), Eastern White Cedar, Yellow Cedar and Swamp Cedar, as well as other names.

Thuja - tree of life

Thuja – tree of life

The Thuja type is often described as having a low self-esteem, with a sense of ugliness inside, though they hide these feelings to the outer world and provide a picture of themselves that they believe others wish to see. This outer appearance is very important to them.

So, again, we see a lack of self-confidence, similar to the Cedarwood, however this time, the lack of self-confidence is derived from a sense of internal ugliness and worthlessness. The behaviour of the Thuja types is to present a pleasing picture, so we may not see the dominance of others around them, however in the early stages of their illness this can be seen when they portray themselves as confident and arrogant.  We do also see the dogmatic type of behaviour, this is portrayed as being a slave to duty, fanatic about their health and also religion, with a rigidity of ideas. The Thuja types are generally very closed, yet polite and mild mannered. They have an underlying feeling that if people really knew them, they would not like them, and they have the need to fit in, almost a desperation to fit in.  In early stages, the overbearing and dictatorial picture can be seen which relates to Cedarwood.  Cedarwood is utilized to improve a sense of self-worth and self-acceptance, which appears to fit well with the Thuja picture.

My internal ugliness means I must present what is acceptable, not who I am

Physically the sphere of action of Thuja is the mucous membranes, though of the genito-urinary region rather than the respiratory system, mind, nerves and skin.  The urinary sphere of action does fit with the Cedarwood physical picture also.

I would be happy to utilise Cedarwood in a blend when using the homeopathic remedy of Thuja. Both appear to be supporting an individuals need to improve their self-worth, and self-acceptance, providing the person with a confidence and belief in themselves to move forward with the next obstacle in their journey, with a degree of self-belief.  Thuja types may also have a past experience that was abusive, and as with Cedarwood, there will be an element of healing this past experience.  On a physical level the urinary mucous membranes are covered in both Thuja and Cedarwood.  I believe that Thuja and Cedarwood are working in the same direction and would be beneficial to work together.

Sabina

There is little to be found on the mental and emotional picture of Sabina, as the emphasis is more on the physical aspects of the remedy.  The picture that does appear on the personality type of Sabina is mainly one of sadness and dejection, nerves irritable, specifically to music, and overall lowered vitality of personality with an enhanced sense of duty towards their family.  This is difficult to compare to the Cedarwood, as there are few specifics, though an overall protection of the family, the weak ones, would be similar.  From a remedy relationship point of view, Sabina is stated to be complementary to Thuja.

Physically Sabina has a sphere of action on the female pelvic organs, specifically the uterus. This does not relate well to the physical actions of Cedarwood, so I would not use Cedarwood with Sabina.  Though, when I look further at Juniper berry/wood, it may be more appropriate to use that essential oil instead.

In beginning this journey, I have discovered there are many different oils that may be beneficial to homeopathic treatment, used as either a supportive treatment or used in conjunction with the homeopathic remedy to support the direction of cure, to improve the secondary action where the body begins the healing process itself.  I have also begun to look at the oils and the remedies in a new light, always a beneficial thing J

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